glas jars labelled catholyt and anloyt

Research projects

glas jars labelled catholyt and anloyt
Information

Please note that only the English language projects are listed on this page. A list of all projects can be found here de.

Current projects

Horizon 2020 "Widening Participation": FunGlass - Center of functional and surface-functionalized glasses Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the European Commission
Funding period: 2015 to 2024

Co-ordination of the Priority Programme „Polymer-based Batteries“ (SPP 2248) Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

Amongst the different energy storage systems/batteries, polymer-based batteries represent an emerging technology. They feature interesting properties like lightweight, printability, flexibility as well as charging within few minutes (down to even seconds). Such polymer-based batteries can be fabricated utilising organic materials without the requirement for other critical raw materials. The well-defined structure of organic/polymer materials offers reliable structure-property relationships, and, thus, a well controllable and tuneable electrochemical behaviour can be achieved. The Priority Programme aims at the elucidation of structure-property-relationships, the design and synthesis of novel active materials, which will result in polymer-based batteries with preferably high capacities and longer lifetime over many cycles.

SPP 2248 "Polymer-based Batteries", Project: Entwicklung von Polymerelektrolyten komplementär zu Modellsystemen für Batterien auf Polymerbasis Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

SPP 2248 "Polymer-based Batteries", Project: Entwicklung neuer redoxaktiver Polymere auf Basis von Benzimidazol, Benzoxazol und Benzothiazol – ein kombinierter theoretischer und experimenteller Screening-Ansatz Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

SPP 2248 "Polymer-based Batteries", Project: Aufklärung von Degradationsmechanismen in Polymer-basierten Dual-Ionen-Batterien und Entwicklung von Strategien zur Leistungsoptimierung Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

SPP 2248 "Polymer-based Batteries", Project: Entwicklung von Aktivmaterialien für organische Batterien basie-rend auf elektropolymerisierten Polymeren mit stabilen organischen Radikalen Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

Sliding contacts in liquid environments: A nanotribology study Show content

Prof. Dr. Enrico Gnecco
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2020 to 2023

Understanding the influence of the surrounding environment on the sliding friction between two solid surfaces in liquids is of utmost importance for applications to MEMS/NEMS or colloidal systems as well as to shed light on the dynamics of formation and rupture of single contact junctions. In this project we aim to perform an experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of contacts formed by sharp silicon tips on sodium chloride, silica, calcite, and molybdenum disulfide using friction force microscopy. The sample surfaces will be exposed to electrolite acqueous solutions to explore specific-ion effects all along the Hofmeister series, and to polar and nonpolar solvents (ethanol, acetone, dichlorobenzene, etc.) with varying viscosities. The different interaction potentials will be quantitatively reconstructed from the time variations of the friction forces acting on the tip with an original method proposed by one of the applicants (RB) and recently applied to reconstruct the free energy landscape of protein unfolding under mechanical load. The results so obtained will be compared to complementary information available with dynamics AFM techniques.

Horizon 2020 "PowerskinPLUS: Highly advanced modular integration of insulation, energising and storage systems for non-residential buildings" European Commission – Horizon 2020 Framework Program – Industrial Leadership Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the European Union
Funding period: 2019 to 2023

Co-ordination ETN POLYSTORAGE: European Training Network in innovative Polymers for next-generation electrochemical energy storage Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the European Union
Funding period: 2019 to 2023

Horizon 2020 "enjulii: Entropic rejuvenation of thin glass products by liquid metal immersion" European Research Council (ERC) - Horizon 2020 Framework Program - Excellent Science Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the European Union
Funding period: 2021 to 2022

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project A01: Strategies for Molecular Repair and Self-regulation in Light-driven Catalysis for Hydrogen Evolution Show content

Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project will strive for developing active repair strategies leading to recycling of the molecular catalyst and creating self-regulating supramolecular light harvesting complexes, which funnel excitation energy to the photocatalyst. Active repair by 1O2 has been demonstrated for the [(tbbpy)2Ru(tpphz)PtI2](PF6)2 system leading to a significantly increased overall TON. More selective and milder active repair mechanisms shall be developed utilizing, e.g. catalytic re-oxidation by polyoxometalates. Self-regulating antenna complexes will be incorporated based on hydrogen bonding and ππ-interactions, which disintegrate, e.g. upon changes of pH value.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project A03: Rylene Dyes as Photosensitizers and Antenna Systems Show content

Prof. Dr. Kalina Peneva
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project focuses on the design of tailored rylene antennas and photosensitizers with broad visible light absorption. Chemical functionalization of the dye will enable coupling to catalytic units, allow soft matter integration, tune the redox potentials and adjust rylene solubility. Additionally, pH-responsive chromophores will be prepared for activity regulation and as local pH probes. Photophysical studies will provide a deeper understanding of the electron transfer processes as well as deactivation and degradation pathways to identify general design guidelines for novel rylene photosensitizers for oxidative and reductive light-driven chemistry.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B01: Structure-Property Relationships of Functional Copolymers on DNA Nanosheets Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

DNA origamis will be used for the precise spatial positioning of functional moieties such as molecular compounds (e.g. dyes, photosensitizers, catalysts and electron relays) as well as functional copolymers. We will elucidate structure-property relationships in these assemblies and study energy/electron transfer processes. Precise assembly of two molecular entities on the surface, assembly of molecular moieties next to copolymers, two functional copolymers, which are assembled in close proximity as well as the surface-routing of single functional moieties is developed.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B02: Integration of Photoredox-active Complexes in Redox-active Polymers for Light-induced Charging and Discharging by Additional Integrated Molecular Catalysts Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project aims at the integration of photoredox-active ruthenium photosensitizers into redox-active copolymers by supramolecular interactions, e.g. ionic interactions or π-stacking. Redox-active moieties such as anthra¬chinones and viologens will be embedded within the polymer and can act as multi-electron storage components to accept electrons transferred by the photosensitizer. Further functionalization of the polymer by metal complex HER catalysts will be used to harvest the stored electron for subsequent catalytic turnover. The influence of the copolymer structure on the electron transfer between photosensitizer – electron relay – catalyst will be investigated in detail.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B03: “POMbranes” – Incorporation of Catalytically Active Polyoxometalates into Integral Asymmetric Block Copolymer Membranes Show content

Prof. Dr. Felix H. Schacher
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project will prepare hierarchically structured block copolymer membranes functionalized with molecular PS and POM catalysts for light-driven WOC and HER. Immobilization by electrostatic, supramolecular and covalent anchoring will be developed and the consequences for light-driven catalytic reactivity and component stability will be explored. For covalent anchoring, suitable organo-functionalization of the POMs will be developed together with complementary functionalization of the block copolymer. Synergistic reaction enhancement by membrane-catalyst interactions will be explored together with the catalytic performance of the composite membrane under flow.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B05: Self-regulating Photocatalytic Materials Based on pH-responsive Block Copolymers Show content

Prof. Dr. Felix H. Schacher
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project develops photocatalytic materials where activity or accessibility of a catalytic center is controlled by external parameters such as pH value or temperature. This will ultimately lead to composites which provide optimum reaction conditions for prolonged periods. We will co-integrate Ru- or rylene-based photosensitizers and Pt- or Co-based catalysts into colloidal polymer models where changing environmental conditions lead to modification of swelling degree or charge density. These structural transitions will be described by theoretical modeling.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B06: Molecular Functionalization of Carbon Nitride Polymers for Light-driven Water Splitting Show content

Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

This project develops a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the interaction of polymeric carbon nitride (CNx)-based materials with molecular redox catalysts and molecular photosensitizers. The project will focus on elucidating factors governing the dynamics of charge separation, charge recombination and catalytic turnover in HER and WOC catalysis. The interdisciplinary approach will yield design rules for the development of molecularly functionalized photoactive CNx materials, and advance our understanding of the fundamental advantages and bottlenecks of CNx-based systems for light-driven oxidative and reductive chemistry.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project B07: Carbon Nanomembranes as Asymmetric, Two-dimensional Matrices for the Immobilization and Dynamic Covalent Regeneration of Molecular Photosensitizers and Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrey Turchanin
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project aims at the development of photocatalytic materials consisting of carbon nanomembranes (CNMs), molecular photosensitizers (PSs) and molecular, cobalt-based catalysts (CAT) for HER catalysis. This includes studies of previously unexplored, photocatalytically relevant properties of CNMs, the preparation and investigation of proof of principle photocatalytic devices, in which PS and CAT are covalently immobilized on the CNM, and exploration of the regeneration of inactive CNM components by means of dynamic covalent exchange reactions.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project C01: Spatially and Temporally Resolved Spectroelectrochemistry Show content

Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project will develop nanoscale and ultrafast time-resolved spectroelectrochemistry to study soft matter integrated molecular catalysts. Environmental effects on the structural features and excited-state properties of reduced/oxidized molecular species when embedded into a soft matter matrix will be deciphered. The project combines electrochemical methods with (i) tip-enhanced spectroscopies and (ii) ultrafast pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy to study the reactivity of matrix-embedded photosensitizers and catalysts. Finally, ultrafast near-field transient absorption spectroscopy will be applied to photocatalytically active films.

CRC/TRR 234 CataLight, Project C05: Structures and Processes in the Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution by Immobilized Metal Complexes Studied from First Principles Show content

Prof. Dr. Stefanie Gräfe
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2022

The project will perform theoretical calculations to explore the consequences of photosensitizer-catalyst dyad integration into soft matter matrices. To understand the performance of model Ruthenium-photosensitizer – bridging ligand – Platinum catalyst dyads for HER, we will initially explore their embedding and photophysical properties on NiO as model surface electrode. Subsequently, we will study more complex soft matter matrices to elucidate how charge separation, charge recombination or interfacial charge transfer affect the catalytic reactivity observed.

Innovation Center CEEC Jena Show content

Funded by the Free State of Thuringia and the European Union funds under the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Funding period: 2017 to 2022

The CEEC Jena Innovation Center offers research and development services as well as education and training in three areas – light-energy conversion, energy storage and clean tech. The grant application concerned the current activities and characteristics of the CEEC Jena in the field of energy storage.

Innovative energy storage technologies are an important element for the success of the energy transition in Germany and for future value creation as an industrial nation in a large number of product areas. The CEEC Jena is specialized in developing next-generation batteries ("Beyond Lithium Batteries") in a holistic research approach that ranges from application-oriented basic research to prototyping. In contrast to competing approaches, the research at the CEEC Jena aims at the replacement of metals (for example, cobalt in lithium batteries or rare earths in nickel-metal hybrid batteries) by environmentally friendly alternatives made of polymers (plastics) or ceramics.

The scientific, economic and social potential of innovative battery systems – from small printable polymer batteries to sodium ion batteries and large stationary energy storage devices (for example, polymer redox flow batteries) – has been confirmed by numerous studies by renowned experts. The CEEC Jena was able to successfully establish itself in this segment and has a clear development concept in order to exploit the opportunities offered by the energy transition for the region. The CEEC Jena thus supports the objectives defined in the framework of the Regional Research and Innovation Strategy (RIS 3 Thuringia). On the one hand, the goal is to build up and expand the scientific top positions and, at the same time, create the conditions to build up complete production and value chains for battery systems in Thuringia and Germany.

LIBRA - Low cost battery based on abundant elements Show content

Prof. Dr. Philipp Adelhelm
Funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the the European Union
Project partners: Prof. Dr. Teofilo Rojo (CIC EnergiGUNE, Álava, Spain), Prof. Dr. Shinichi Komaba (Tokyo University of Science, Tokio, Japan)
Funding period: 2018 to 2021

EDLstruct: Effect of carbon electrodes porous structure and electrolyte properties on the formation and composition of the electrical double-layer Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrea Balducci
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2018 to 2021

The formation of an electrical double-layer (EDL) in a porous conductive electrode, e.g., from activated carbon (AC), represents one of the most appealing strategies for fast storage of energy and, consequently, for the realization of high power energy storage devices. However, the existing models of EDL which consider the electrolyte border with a flat surface cannot be applied to the case of microporous (<2 nm) AC electrodes. Recently, in-situ techniques have provided important information about the EDL properties in AC electrodes, yet they were implemented with a unique electrolyte and a unique type of porous carbon. Therefore, the objective of the EDLstruct project is to implement a variety of organic electrolytes with a variety of carbons of well-defined porous structure in order to study: i) the influence of pore size and molecules size on the ions/solvent ratio under polarization, and ii) to find correlations between the EDL structure and the decay of electrochemical performance of carbon electrodes depending on temperature and electrodes potential. In order to realize this program, strong competence in carbonaceous materials (PUT group) as well as in electrolytes (FSU Jena group) is needed. In addition, the use of in-operando techniques (PUT) is required to monitor the effects of molecular fluxes and EDL decomposition during polarization of electrodes. Hence, the research objectives will be reached by conducting 5 work packages. FSU Jena will design a number of non-aqueous electrolytes (WP1), while PUT will design and characterize ACs with different structural properties (WP2). The electrochemical performance of AC electrodes in combination with the considered electrolytes will be investigated by both groups. In order to acquire information about the double-layer formation, post-mortem analyses of polarized electrodes by thermoprogrammed desorption and in-operando electrical dilatometry will be carried out by PUT (WP3). The influence of the electrode-electrolyte interaction on the thermal stability of the double-layer will be investigated in WP4 by FSU Jena (TGA/DSC) and PUT (electrochemical on-line mass spectrometry). The experimental results will be critically discussed in WP5, giving rise to publications and presentations at international conferences.

Redox-active ionic liquids in redox-flow-batteries Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation
Funding period: 2018 to 2021

Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are interesting candidates for stationary energy storage. Their capacity and power can be scaled independently by adjusting the size of the storage tank and the cell stack, respectively. In contrast to classical batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) are based on active materials, which are dissolved (suspended) in a liquid electrolyte. Consequently, the achievable energy densities are limited due to the presence of a non-active solvent (often water). The most investigated RFB is the all vanadium RFB, which utilizes vanadium ions dissolved in sulfuric acid. In recent years, the interest in organic (polymeric) active materials is steadily growing. This joined proposal aims to develop redox-active ionic liquids (IL) as new materials for the electrolytes of RFBs. All molecules present in the electrolyte will therefore be redox-active. Additionally, the limited voltage window of aqueous electrolytes will be extended. Consequently, higher energy densities will be achievable.The project will be investigated by the two partners at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry as well as Institute for Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry). Latter partner will contribute to the synthesis and structural characterization of novel redox-active ionic liquids. These ILs will comprise redox-active moieties and ionic groups. The properties will be tuned by the respective structure of the IL. Furthermore IOMC will perform the tests of the synthesized materials in test RFB cells. The ITUC will contribute to the extensive characterization of the synthesized materials. In particular the electrochemical as well as thermal properties will be of interest.

Block copolymer based hybrid materials for direct electrochemical biosensing of nucleic acids and hemoproteins Show content

Prof. Dr. Felix Helmut Schacher
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2018 to 2021
Project partner: Dr. Larisa Sigolaeva, Moscow State University, Russia

The project aims at the development of experimentally available reagentless electrochemical methods for identification and quantification of nucleic acids and hemoproteins. The level of circulating tumor DNA, RNA, or micro RNA can be taken as a measure for diagnostic and prognostic approaches to different types of cancer. Simultaneously, a considerable release of hemoprotein cytochrome c occurs during the treatment of cancer cells with anti-cancer drugs, and this level can then be taken as measure for the efficiency of a certain drug, the screening of new potential drug candidates or, in turn, as an indicator for cell resistance towards anti-cancer therapy. Simultaneous detection and quantification of both these biomarkers could considerably increase the efficiency of anti-cancer therapy with respect to (subtle) differences between different patients and help in developing strategies for personalized medicine.The sensitivity of direct electrochemical analysis strictly depends on the degree of integration of the analyte within the working electrode, in our case a nanocomposite material. For this purpose, a combination of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes or graphene oxide), noble metal nanoparticles (gold or silver nanoparticles), and amphiphilic block copolymers will be used. Therefore, we first focus on principles of organic/inorganic nanocomposite fabrication based on uniformly solubilized carbon nanomaterials and, eventually, noble metal nanoparticles. The employed amphiphilic diblock copolymers will serve a triple role. First, they are used as dispersing agent for the carbon nanomaterial due to hydrophobic interactions between the latter and the hydrophobic block. Further, the hydrophilic (and ionic) part of the material can be used to complex metal ions, followed by reduction to metal nanoparticles. Finally, after deposition on suitable substrates the diblock copolymer serves as matrix material for specific interaction with target biomolecules. The role of the carbon nanomaterial is to improve conductivity of the entire composite and the efficiency of electron transfer. Finally, the presence of metal nanoparticles is expected to catalyze electrochemical reactions. In total, these effects will synergistically provide a considerable improvement of biosensor sensitivity and selectivity for direct electrochemical analysis of both nucleic acids and cytochrome c.During the course of this project, a thorough examination of bioanalytical properties will involve a systematic investigation towards optimal construction and composition of the block copolymer/carbon nanomaterial/metal nanoparticle hybrid material. Subsequently, best working constructs will be used to assess biosensor characteristics, followed by the development of application strategies for direct electrochemical analysis of real samples (whole blood, plasma or serum).

Horizon 2020 "Excellent Science" (ERC) : Unifying concepts in the topological design of disordered solids - UTOPES Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the European Commission
Funding period: 2016 to 2021

Redox-active ionic liquids in redox-flowbatteries Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrea Balducci/Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: from 2018

Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are interesting candidates for stationary energy storage. Their capacity and power can be scaled independently by adjusting the size of the storage tank and the cell stack, respectively. In contrast to classical batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) are based on active materials, which are dissolved (suspended) in a liquid electrolyte. Consequently, the achievable energy densities are limited due to the presence of a non-active solvent (often water). The most investigated RFB is the all vanadium RFB, which utilizes vanadium ions dissolved in sulfuric acid. In recent years, the interest in organic (polymeric) active materials is steadily growing. This joined proposal aims to develop redox-active ionic liquids (IL) as new materials for the electrolytes of RFBs. All molecules present in the electrolyte will therefore be redox-active. Additionally, the limited voltage window of aqueous electrolytes will be extended. Consequently, higher energy densities will be achievable.The project will be investigated by the two partners at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Institute for Technical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry as well as Institute for Organic Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry). Latter partner will contribute to the synthesis and structural characterization of novel redox-active ionic liquids. These ILs will comprise redox-active moieties and ionic groups. The properties will be tuned by the respective structure of the IL. Furthermore IOMC will perform the tests of the synthesized materials in test RFB cells. The ITUC will contribute to the extensive characterization of the synthesized materials. In particular the electrochemical as well as thermal properties will be of interest.

Completed projects

The combined use of computational screening and electrochemical characterization for the identification of new electrolyte components for supercapacitors Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrea Balducci
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2017 to 2020

The project proposes the use of an innovative strategy for the identification of new electrolyte components for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), in which computational screening and electrochemical characterization are combined. In order to realize advanced EDLCs the introduction of new electrolyte components, solvents and salts, is strongly needed. To identify a new component experimentally is difficult and time consuming, especially when dealing with a completely new group of compounds. In order to avoid a time consuming 'trial and error' approach, the introduction of an effective 'virtual' (i.e. computer-based) screening method is therefore of great importance. Such a screening should allow for a fast prediction of the properties of a large number of compounds from many different classes, which in turn would enable the identification of the most promising candidates. Recent work showed that this innovative approach can be successfully used for the identification of new electrolyte components and, thus, it should be seen as a new and powerful tool for the development of advanced EDLCs. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to optimize such a strategy and, also, to understand the chemical-physical and electrochemical properties of new solvents and new conducting salts suitable for the EDLC technology.

PhotoFlow - Photoelectrochemical Redox-Flow batteries Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWI)
Funding period: 2017 to 2020

Towards Photoactive Membranes for Artificial Photosynthesis Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrey Turchanin, Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek, Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2017 to 2020

Sodium-ion storage in carbon nanomaterials Show content

Prof. Dr. Philipp Adelhelm
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Sino-German Center for Research Promotion (SGC)
International joint project with the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Peking (China)
Funding period: 2017 to 2020

The search for efficient, reliable and low-cost electrochemical energy stores is an on-going and societally highly relevant task. As lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology more and more approaches its intrinsic limits, a range of alternatives is currently being studied. This also includes sodium-ion batteries (NIBs) that are largely motivated by the abundance of sodium. Even without sodium’s abundance, there is a clear and general need to develop potential alternatives to conventional LIB technology as a massive increase in materials supply is expected once electrification of transport and stationary energy storage enter the mass market. Using carbon materials in NIBs is therefore a straightforward approach to render batteries based on abundant elements. The use of carbon materials in NIBs is, however, poorly understood and so far does not meet all relevant criteria for application (capacity, kinetics, coulombic efficiency, redox potential). Overall, there is a clear need for more fundamental understanding of storing sodium-ions in carbon structure. Here, the project aims at making some important contributions. Carbon materials with tailored structure and chemical composition will be synthesized and their ion storage behavior in sodium (and lithium) cells will be evaluated with the aim to provide insights into the complex storage phenomena as well as the underlying physical-chemical principles. As a main content of the project, the influence of surface chemistry, morphology and hetero atom doping on the kinetics and thermodynamics of the charge storage mechanism as well as on the surface film formation (solid electrolyte interphase, SEI) will be studied. This way, we aim at overcoming current limitations for carbon materials for sodium-ion batteries and will also be able to judge on whether carbon nanomaterials remain model systems or can really contribute to the development of practical NIBs.

Tailored Optical Fibres, TP1.3 &4.1 Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
Funding period: 2017 to 2019

SPP 1594 "Topological Engineering of Ultra-Strong Glasses" Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek (Co-ordinator)
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2012 to 2019

Accepting brittleness and benefiting from their optical properties and universal processability, glassy materials have found their traditional applications in environments with low levels of tensile stress. It was recognised, however, that intrinsically glasses represent the strongest man-made material, which can be produced on large-scale. Only for low resistance to surface damage, the uniquely high levels of intrinsic strength can presently not be made use of. In a broader context, covering all classes of disordered materials (distinguished by the nature of chemical bonds), brittleness, stiffness, elastic limit and the practical absence of ductility originate from their molecular, mid-range and surface topology. In inorganic as well as metallic glasses and in contrast to any other solid material, mechanical properties must be considered in a twofold way: on the basis of structural length scales and dynamics. Identification of determinant topological and density constraints and their engineering towards ultrahigh toughness is now seen as the major future breakthrough of the field. As to yet disregarded synergy arises from the joint treatment of both classes of glass: from a topo-mechanical view, both materials appear to follow the same constitutive principles of coordination, packing density, free volume, structural dynamics, structural heterogeneity and extreme mid- to long-range homogeneity. The Priority Programme has the objective to condense existing experimental and theoretical competencies within Germany to enable a conceptual breakthrough in the understanding and design of the mechanical properties of glasses. For the first time, inorganic and metallic glasses will be considered in a joint context. Key to topical success, international visibly and long-lasting impact is the effective coordination of this effort for which a number of central activities are planned, including the organisation of national and international workshops and conferences, the promotion of young researchers, equal opportunity actions, setting-up a mentoring programme and ensuring high-impact outreach and networking.

Benzotriazinyl radical containing polymers as bipolar active electrode material in organic secondary batteries Show content

Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2016 to 2019

The growing interest in mobile devices and their increasing integration into the World Wide Web (Internet of Things) necessitates the availability and development of small and flexible energy-storage systems. However, lithium ion batteries, which represent the current benchmark technology, do not allow the assembly of flexible batteries and demand environmentally questionable techniques for production and processing of raw materials as well as for the final disposal of disused devices. Hence, current research focuses more and more on thin film batteries that are based on organic redox active molecules, which are prepared through organic synthesis and disposed free of residues via burning. Furthermore, their (electro)chemical properties can be easily tuned through choosing a suitable chemical structure. Unfortunately, small molecules tend to dissolve in the used electrolyte leading to a significantly decreased lifetime of the battery. Thus, the monomeric redox active units are integrated into long chain polymers, which possess a substantially decreased solubility.In the course of the project, in particular polymers that are based on the benzo-1,2,4-triazinyl radical are developed. This molecule features electrochemical reversibility, high stability against air and moisture, as well as facile synthetic accessibility. Its redox characteristics can be, furthermore, easily tuned through the molecular substitution pattern, which enables even the preparation of systems that can serve both as anode and cathode material, allowing the construction of bipolar, i. e. poleless, batteries.The increase of the batteries still low theoretical capacity (from around 60 to over 100 mAh g-1) represents a central goal, which should be mainly achieved through the reduction of the molar mass of the monomer. (Electro)chemical stability, cell voltages of around 1.2 V (to allow for aqueous electrolytes), and polymerizability of the molecule have to be maintained, which is ensured through the investigation of structure-property relationships in the course of substituent variations to enable a systematic optimization of the system. The characterization process comprises the preliminary characterization of the monomeric and polymeric compounds in solution and in the solid state, the processing of the polymers with conductive additives and binder materials toward thin film composite electrodes and their subsequent characterization, as well as the assembly and comprehensive investigation of half-organic (using lithium or sodium as anode material) and full organic cells. Furthermore, the preparation of the batteries is optimized, in particular with regard to the used additives and the thin-film processing (doctor blading, inkjet printing).

Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of conversion reactions in new, sodium based battery systems Show content

Prof. Dr. Philipp Adelhelm
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2016 to 2019

The development of safe and low cost electrochemical energy storage devices with high energy densities is one of the key challenges for current battery research. Current lithium-ion battery technology is mostly based on the reversible formation of intercalation compounds with layered structure. Higher capacities can be achieved by compounds that undergo so-called conversion reactions with lithium. The general reaction can be written as MaXb + (bc)Li = aM + b LicX with M being a transition metal (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, etc.), X being a non-metal (F, O, N, P, S, etc.), and Li being lithium. Despite the intensive research in this field, no suitable electrode material could be identified so far that exhibits suitable cell characteristics for application at room temperature. Aim of the present research proposal is to investigate the largely unknown cell chemistry of sodium based conversion reactions for their use in room temperature sodium-ion batteries. The second important aim is to compare the cell chemistry of sodium based conversion reactions with the analogue lithium system. Similarities and differences between both reactions will be used to deepen the fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms of conversion reactions. As a result, general guidelines for the improvement of conversion systems towards application might be formulated. In both cases, experiments using thin film model electrodes allow the most accurate and exact investigations. Here, an important advantage of sodium over lithium is the easier analytical access due to the higher atomic weight of Na compared to Li. Objective of the subproject bulk phase is the systematic investigation of the general cell chemistry of conversion reactions and their structural characterization with standard methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry). Important aim of the subproject is, to identify the most promising compounds MaXb for the comparison between sodium and the analogue lithium systems. Objective of the subproject model systems is the preparation of highly defined model electrodes and cells from selected compounds by means of pulsed laser deposition with the aim to develop suitable in situ experiments.

Redox chemistry of ternary graphite intercalation compounds: Theory and Experiment Show content

Prof. Dr. Philipp Adelhelm
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Project partner: Prof. Dr. Doreen Mollenhauer (Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen)
Funding period: 2017 to 2018

Gas- and liquid-phase deposition of non-crystalline solids Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek
Funded by the Carl-Zeiss-Stiftung
Funding period: 2015 to 2019

HORIZON 2020 Flagship Graphene-based disruptive technologies Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrey Turchanin
Funded by the European Commission
Funding period: 2016 bis 2018

Protic ionic liquids as innovative electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries Show content

Prof. Dr. Andrea Balducci
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2015 bis 2018

Self-Healing Inspired by Nature: Exocytosis-Like Repair of Membranes and Interfaces Composed of Self-Assembled Luminescent Dyes Show content

part of the SPP1568 Design and Generic Principles of Self-healing Materials
PD Dr. Martin Presselt
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period:2014 - 2018

Horizon 2020 "Industrial Leadership": Large Area Fluidic Windows Show content

Prof. Dr. Lothar Wondraczek (Co-ordinator)
Funded by the European Commission
Funding period: 2015 bis 2017

Self-healing block copolymer films from mechanistic understanding towards applications in coatings and membranes Show content

Prof. Dr. Felix Helmut Schacher
Funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG)
Funding period: 2014 bis 2017
DFG project in the SPP1568

Self-organized dye-nanostructures for photovoltaic applications Show content

PD Dr. Martin Presselt
Funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
Funding period: 2013 - 2017

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